Ron Davis with beloved horseman Harry DeLeyer at the 23rd Annual Hamptons International Film Festival. Photo courtesy  Zimbio

Ron Davis with beloved horseman Harry DeLeyer at the 23rd Annual Hamptons International Film Festival.
Photo courtesy Zimbio

hbo, netflix, and a plow-horse named snowman
ron davis

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Airing July 5, 2019

[Excerpted from Palm Beach Post]

When Ron Davis decided to become a documentary filmmaker at age 38, he didn’t know anything about making movies. He’d never directed a scene. He’d never interviewed a subject. He wasn’t some auteur who’d spent his childhood studying camera angles in obscure foreign films. He didn’t even like documentaries that much.

But he believed in one thing: his gut instinct.

He learned fast. A decade later, Davis has created his own film company, won numerous awards, developed one movie for HBO and is riding high on the success of “Harry and Snowman.”

The documentary, about an immigrant equestrian who paid $80 for a plow horse and turned him into a world-renowned show jumper, has been praised by major newspapers from New York to Los Angeles.

Davis isn’t some Hollywood player. He works out of Wellington, in a non-descript office complex. His film empire is a tiny room — call it an expanded cubicle — that you get to by walking down a narrow hallway lined with therapists. (“The screams start about 6 p.m.,” he jokes.)

It doesn’t take long to realize that the Ron Davis story — an improbable, do-it-yourself tale of pluck, luck and sheer willpower — would make a hell of a Ron Davis movie.